From an Important Midwestern Collection


  • JoyceJScott_Necklace_Landscapes copy.jpg
  • JoycJScott_Necklace_LandscapesBack copy.jpg
  • HMWhite_Brooch_Front.jpg
  • HMWhite_Brooch_Detail.jpg
  • HMWhite_Brooch_Back.jpg
  • IDKa.jpg
  • IDKb.jpg
  • IDkcenter.jpg
  • IDkdetail.jpg
  • JulieMihalisan_Brooch_Back.jpg
  • JulieMihalisan_Brooch.jpg
  • JulieMihalisin_BroochNecklace.jpg
  • JulieMihalisin_BroochNecklace_Detail.jpg
  • JulieMihalisin_BroochNecklace_Back.jpg
  • Rossbach, Ed_Big Fella_1989 1.jpg
  • Rossbach, Ed_Big Fella_1989_7%22x8.5%22x5.75%22.jpg
  • Rossbach, Ed_Big Fella_1989 title.jpg
  • KimOverstreet_RobinKnamitzy_1989_1455_Front.jpg
  • KimOverstreet_RobinKnamitzy_1989_1455_Back.jpg
  • KimOverstreet_RobinKnamitzy_1994_1650_Front.jpg
  • KimOverstreet_RobinKnamitzy_1994_1650_Back.jpg
  • Ramona_Necklace_Front.jpg
  • Ramona_Necklace_Detail_F.jpg
  • Ramona_Necklace_Detail.jpg
  • Ramona_Necklace_BackDetail.jpg
  • Ramona_Necklace2_Front.jpg
  • Ramona_Necklace2_Back.jpg
  • Ramona_Necklace2_BackDetails.jpg
  • unidentified_Brooch_Front.jpg
  • Unidentified_Brooch_Back.jpg
  • Unidentified_Brooch_Detail.jpg
  • Rossbach, Ed_Bark Structure_1993_11%22x6.75%22x8%22.jpg
  • Rossbach, Ed_Bark Structure_1993 2.jpg
  • Rossbach, Ed_Bark Structure_1993 3.jpg
  • Rossbach, Ed_Bark Structure_1993 title.jpg

Joyce J. Scott
Landscapes, 1994

Neckpiece. Beaded glass beads.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Joyce J. Scott
Landscapes, 1994 (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Heather White
Protean Cameo #3, 1999

18K gold, coral, sterling silver


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Heather White
Protean Cameo #3, 1999 (from side)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Heather White
Protean Cameo #3, 1999 (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Tina Fungholder


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Tina Fungholder


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Tina Fungholder


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Tina Fungholder


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Brooch, 1990

Reversible brooch,glass, silver, 14k gold


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Brooch, 1990 (opposite side)

Reversible brooch,glass, silver, 14k gold


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches, 1993

Slumped glass, sterling silver, fine silver, gold


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches, 1993 (detail of removed brooches)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Big Fella, 1989


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Big Fella, 1989 (other side)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Big Fella, 1989 (signature detail)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
Brooch #1445, Apex, 1989.

Copper,silver, polymer clay, paper, found objects. Signed and dated by artists.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
Brooch #1445, Apex, 1989. (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
Brooch # 1650, Untitled, 1994

Copper,silver, polymer clay, paper, found objects, leaf segment of a brass drawer pull,
Signed, dated, and numbered by artists.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
Brooch # 1650, Untitled, 1994 (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Japanese Trick Box, pendant, 1994

Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail)

Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail back)

Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord. There is some wear to the leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail clasp)

Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord. There is some wear to the leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Amulet

Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Amulet (back)

Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Pendant (clasp detail)

Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Joe Wood
Circum Brooch, 1990

Oxidized silver,gold,stainless steel. hand fabricated pin back


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Joe Wood
Circum Brooch, 1990 (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Joe Wood
Circum Brooch, 1990 (side)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Bark Structure, 1983


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Bark Structure, 1983 (top)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Bark Structure, 1983 (another angle)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Bark Structure, 1983 (signature detail)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

  • IMAGES:
  • /
  • JoyceJScott_Necklace_Landscapes copy.jpg
    Joyce J. Scott
    Landscapes, 1994

    Neckpiece. Beaded glass beads.

    13” l x 7” w (outer oval) 10” l x 5 1/2” w (inner oval)

    “The rich social import of Scott’s work is matched by its visual richness. Scott describes her beadwork as a cross between sculpture and painting. The artist treats the beads like the dabs of paint in a Pointillist canvas, but unlike paint (a medium Scott has tried), glass beads have the advantage of being translucent and can both capture and reflect light. Scott’s virtuoso weaving technique – a method similar to crochet called the peyote stitch, which she learned from a Cree Indian – allows great fluidity of form, resulting in protruding hollow forms and undulating effects. Scott is always seeking greater technical challenges; her work has grown increasingly more daring and dazzling in its visual richness and range of subject matter.” – Susan Grant Lewin, One of a Kind: American Art Jewelry Today.

    Renowned as the “Queen of Beadwork,” Joyce J. Scott’s exuberant beaded sculptural forms and neckpieces are provocative and confrontational, addressing contentious political and social issues such as gender, race, and class struggle. Born and raised in Baltimore, Joyce is a descendant of African-Americans, Native Americans, and Scots. Three generations of storytellers, quilters, basket makers, and wood, metal, and clay workers inspire her artwork.

    Inquire

  • JoycJScott_Necklace_LandscapesBack copy.jpg
    Joyce J. Scott
    Landscapes, 1994 (back)

    Inquire

  • HMWhite_Brooch_Front.jpg
    Heather White
    Protean Cameo #3, 1999

    18K gold, coral, sterling silver

    33/8”l x1/2”wx1/2”deep

    "Heather White’s work is highly influenced by historical metal objects and ornamentation made for royal figures, non-secular rituals and military forces, such as crowns, brooches and other forms of adornment. These pieces are at once beautiful, sculptural forms as well as functional objects that relate to the viewers’ physical presence, to the essence and history of antiquated objects and to the concerns of the era. White’s work combines the inherent beauty of working with precious metals with larger issues surrounding ornamentation and decoration.”

    Inquire

  • HMWhite_Brooch_Detail.jpg
    Heather White
    Protean Cameo #3, 1999 (from side)

    Inquire

  • HMWhite_Brooch_Back.jpg
    Heather White
    Protean Cameo #3, 1999 (back)

    Inquire

  • IDKa.jpg
    Tina Fungholder

    17” l x 2” w x 5” diameter

    Inquire

  • IDKb.jpg
    Tina Fungholder

    Inquire

  • IDkcenter.jpg
    Tina Fungholder

    Inquire

  • IDkdetail.jpg
    Tina Fungholder

    Inquire

  • JulieMihalisan_Brooch_Back.jpg
    Julie Mihalisan
    Brooch, 1990

    Reversible brooch,glass, silver, 14k gold

    1” l x 4” w x 3/8” deep

    "Julie Mihalisin first began working with glass and precious metal as a graduate student at London's Royal College of Art. She quickly developed a fascination with the contrasting properties of glass and metal. The artist experimented with the technique of "kiln-slumped glass jewelry," in which a metal framework that helps shape the glass is in turn entrapped in the glass."

    "Mihalisan's passion for glass is evident in her jewelry forms, combining the transparent fluidity of glass and fusing it with metal. Her glass seems to ooze out of the metal, giving it a unique movement.”

    Collections:
    Smithsonian Institution Cooper Hewitt Museum,New York,NY
    The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston,MA

    Inquire

  • JulieMihalisan_Brooch.jpg
    Julie Mihalisan
    Brooch, 1990 (opposite side)

    Reversible brooch,glass, silver, 14k gold

    Inquire

  • JulieMihalisin_BroochNecklace.jpg
    Julie Mihalisan
    Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches, 1993

    Slumped glass, sterling silver, fine silver, gold

    19” l x 2 1/8” longest element

    "Julie Mihalisin first began working with glass and precious metal as a graduate student at London's Royal College of Art. She quickly developed a fascination with the contrasting properties of glass and metal. The artist experimented with the technique of "kiln-slumped glass jewelry," in which a metal framework that helps shape the glass is in turn entrapped in the glass."

    "Mihalisan's passion for glass is evident in her jewelry forms, combining the transparent fluidity of glass and fusing it with metal. Her glass seems to ooze out of the metal, giving it a unique movement.”

    Collections:
    Smithsonian Institution Cooper Hewitt Museum,New York,NY
    The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston,MA

    Inquire

  • JulieMihalisin_BroochNecklace_Detail.jpg
    Julie Mihalisan
    Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches, 1993 (detail of removed brooches)

    Inquire

  • JulieMihalisin_BroochNecklace_Back.jpg
    Julie Mihalisan
    Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches (back)

    Inquire

  • Rossbach, Ed_Big Fella_1989 1.jpg
    Ed Rossbach
    Big Fella, 1989

    7”x 8.5”x 5.75”

    Inquire

  • Rossbach, Ed_Big Fella_1989_7%22x8.5%22x5.75%22.jpg
    Ed Rossbach
    Big Fella, 1989 (other side)

    Inquire

  • Rossbach, Ed_Big Fella_1989 title.jpg
    Ed Rossbach
    Big Fella, 1989 (signature detail)

    Inquire

  • KimOverstreet_RobinKnamitzy_1989_1455_Front.jpg
    Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
    Brooch #1445, Apex, 1989.

    Copper,silver, polymer clay, paper, found objects. Signed and dated by artists.

    3 7/8” l x 1 7/8” w x 1/2” deep

    Provenance: Made in the artists studio in Virginia. "Robin Kranitzky and Kim Overstreet run a company called Lost and Found. They design wearable art using found objects. The two became friends while working at a Richmond, Virginia, department store, and their shared interest in collecting led them to create jewelry together based on their “finds.” Their brooches are collage-like dioramas that often incorporate their fascinations with fairy tales, science fiction, surrealism, and theater."

    Inquire

  • KimOverstreet_RobinKnamitzy_1989_1455_Back.jpg
    Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
    Brooch #1445, Apex, 1989. (back)

    Inquire

  • KimOverstreet_RobinKnamitzy_1994_1650_Front.jpg
    Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
    Brooch # 1650, Untitled, 1994

    Copper,silver, polymer clay, paper, found objects, leaf segment of a brass drawer pull, Signed, dated, and numbered by artists.

    2’ X 2 3/4” X 3/4"

    Provenance: Made in the artists studio in Virginia. Exhibited at SOFA. Chicago, Illinois October 20 - 23, 1994. "Robin Kranitzky and Kim Overstreet run a company called Lost and Found. They design wearable art using found objects. The two became friends while working at a Richmond, Virginia, department store, and their shared interest in collecting led them to create jewelry together based on their “finds.” Their brooches are collage-like dioramas that often incorporate their fascinations with fairy tales, science fiction, surrealism, and theater."

    Inquire

  • KimOverstreet_RobinKnamitzy_1994_1650_Back.jpg
    Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
    Brooch # 1650, Untitled, 1994 (back)

    Inquire

  • Ramona_Necklace_Front.jpg
    Ramona Solberg
    Japanese Trick Box, pendant, 1994

    Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord.

    23”l x 7 1/2”diameter, pendant: 3 1/8”l x 3”w x 3/8” deep

    RAMONA SOLBERG (1921-2005)

     

    “Jewelry should communicate warmth and kinship. It succeeds best when it connects with people.” Ramona Solberg quoted in Adornment Newsletter, Fall 2001

     

    "Ramona Solberg is considered a pioneer of the studio jewelry movement, often called  " the Grandmother of Northwest Found-Art Jewelry". She generously shared her time and knowledge teaching at the University of Washington and  Central Washington University).  A generation of jewelry artists including Laurie Hall, Ron Ho and Kiff Slemmons were mentored and inspired by Ramona. After World War  She studied jewelry on the GI Bill after World War II (during which she served in the U.S. and for three years after the war in Germany as an information and education sergeant).  Ramona was an adventurous and intrepid traveler to all corners of the world and a collector of all sorts of wondrous and strange bits and pieces and fragments of this and that, which she incorporated into her work. Ramona was a firm believer that if it isn’t fun, then why do it? This was her personal and her professional mantra.

    Feathers, beads, toy parts, shells, buttons, coins, pieces of bone (anything and everything she collected) were stored in jars in her studios in Seattle and Ellensburg, Washington. It was like walking into a sorcerer’s workshop with magical elements everywhere you turned.From this treasure trove Ramona drew upon her Norwegian heritage to bring order to what could have been chaos. All of her jewelry is laid out and engineered to design perfection. Suddenly objects found on a beach have relevance and symmetry when placed next to a bottle cap or a domino or a discarded piano key because of their precise arrangement."  

     


                                                                   

    "Ramona Solberg was one of the first jewelers to break away from making traditional decorative ornaments and to bring intensely personal statements into jewelry design. Her pieces which reflect basically symbolic forms, appeal to those who regard their personal adornments as talismans of our time."  

     

    Objects USA  exhibition catalogue  Museum of Arts and Design 1970 

     


     

    Ramona Solberg (1921 – 2005) liked a fast-paced mystery novel, a good martini, the company of friends and the riches of the world’s diverse material cultures. When she died  in 2005 at the age of 84, she had achieved wide notoriety for her jewellery’s innovative designs and her influence as a teacher, had received the National Metalsmiths Hall of Fame Award, and had been profiled as a “Living Treasure” in the documentary, Ramona Solberg: Jeweler, Teacher, Traveler. She was also honored as a fellow of The American Crafts Council.

     

    Ms. Solberg eschewed precious materials and made necklaces and pins out of found objects from cultures around the world — bottle tops, dice, sardine cans, dominos, beads, bone , tea whisks, beetle boxes, Polish amber, Persian petrified coal (jet), game boards and coins. The Sand Point apartment where she lived alone was jammed with boxes and drawers of such items, many of which she collected during her extensive travels. The resulting pieces were large and substantial,in her words,  "meant to be worn rather than displayed in cases."

     


     

    TRAINING/EDUCATION:

    MFA,University of Washington,Seattle,WA

    University de Michoacan, Morelia,Mexico

    California College of Art and Design, Oakland,CA

    Statens Kunst og Hanverk, Oslo

    Bellas Artes, San Miguel 

     

    SELECTED COLLECTIONS:

     

    Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles.CA

    Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution,Washington,DC

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art,New York,NY    

    The Museum of Fine Arts,Boston,MA

    Museum of Art and Design, New York,NY

    Museum of Contemporary Craft

    Jacksonville Art Museum, Jacksonville,Florida

    King County Art Commission, Seattle,WA

    Seattle Art Museum,Seattle,WA

    Tacoma Art Museum,Tacoma, Washington

    Inquire

  • Ramona_Necklace_Detail_F.jpg
    Ramona Solberg
    Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail)

    Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord.

    Inquire

  • Ramona_Necklace_Detail.jpg
    Ramona Solberg
    Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail back)

    Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord. There is some wear to the leather cord.

    RAMONA SOLBERG (1921-2005)

     

    “Jewelry should communicate warmth and kinship. It succeeds best when it connects with people.” Ramona Solberg quoted in Adornment Newsletter, Fall 2001

     

    "Ramona Solberg is considered a pioneer of the studio jewelry movement, often called  " the Grandmother of Northwest Found-Art Jewelry". She generously shared her time and knowledge teaching at the University of Washington and  Central Washington University).  A generation of jewelry artists including Laurie Hall, Ron Ho and Kiff Slemmons were mentored and inspired by Ramona. After World War  She studied jewelry on the GI Bill after World War II (during which she served in the U.S. and for three years after the war in Germany as an information and education sergeant).  Ramona was an adventurous and intrepid traveler to all corners of the world and a collector of all sorts of wondrous and strange bits and pieces and fragments of this and that, which she incorporated into her work. Ramona was a firm believer that if it isn’t fun, then why do it? This was her personal and her professional mantra.

    Feathers, beads, toy parts, shells, buttons, coins, pieces of bone (anything and everything she collected) were stored in jars in her studios in Seattle and Ellensburg, Washington. It was like walking into a sorcerer’s workshop with magical elements everywhere you turned.From this treasure trove Ramona drew upon her Norwegian heritage to bring order to what could have been chaos. All of her jewelry is laid out and engineered to design perfection. Suddenly objects found on a beach have relevance and symmetry when placed next to a bottle cap or a domino or a discarded piano key because of their precise arrangement."  

     


                                                                   

    "Ramona Solberg was one of the first jewelers to break away from making traditional decorative ornaments and to bring intensely personal statements into jewelry design. Her pieces which reflect basically symbolic forms, appeal to those who regard their personal adornments as talismans of our time."  

     

    Objects USA  exhibition catalogue  Museum of Arts and Design 1970 

     


     

    Ramona Solberg (1921 – 2005) liked a fast-paced mystery novel, a good martini, the company of friends and the riches of the world’s diverse material cultures. When she died  in 2005 at the age of 84, she had achieved wide notoriety for her jewellery’s innovative designs and her influence as a teacher, had received the National Metalsmiths Hall of Fame Award, and had been profiled as a “Living Treasure” in the documentary, Ramona Solberg: Jeweler, Teacher, Traveler. She was also honored as a fellow of The American Crafts Council.

     

    Ms. Solberg eschewed precious materials and made necklaces and pins out of found objects from cultures around the world — bottle tops, dice, sardine cans, dominos, beads, bone , tea whisks, beetle boxes, Polish amber, Persian petrified coal (jet), game boards and coins. The Sand Point apartment where she lived alone was jammed with boxes and drawers of such items, many of which she collected during her extensive travels. The resulting pieces were large and substantial,in her words,  "meant to be worn rather than displayed in cases."

     


     

    TRAINING/EDUCATION:

    MFA,University of Washington,Seattle,WA

    University de Michoacan, Morelia,Mexico

    California College of Art and Design, Oakland,CA

    Statens Kunst og Hanverk, Oslo

    Bellas Artes, San Miguel 

     

    SELECTED COLLECTIONS:

     

    Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles.CA

    Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution,Washington,DC

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art,New York,NY    

    The Museum of Fine Arts,Boston,MA

    Museum of Art and Design, New York,NY

    Museum of Contemporary Craft

    Jacksonville Art Museum, Jacksonville,Florida

    King County Art Commission, Seattle,WA

    Seattle Art Museum,Seattle,WA

    Tacoma Art Museum,Tacoma, Washington

    Inquire

  • Ramona_Necklace_BackDetail.jpg
    Ramona Solberg
    Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail clasp)

    Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord. There is some wear to the leather cord.

    Inquire

  • Ramona_Necklace2_Front.jpg
    Ramona Solberg
    Amulet

    Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.

    20” l x 7 1/2” diameter pendant: 4”l x 3”w x 7/8” deep

    Inquire

  • Ramona_Necklace2_Back.jpg
    Ramona Solberg
    Amulet (back)

    Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.

    Inquire

  • Ramona_Necklace2_BackDetails.jpg
    Ramona Solberg
    Pendant (clasp detail)

    Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.

    Inquire

  • unidentified_Brooch_Front.jpg
    Joe Wood
    Circum Brooch, 1990

    Oxidized silver,gold,stainless steel. hand fabricated pin back

    2”l x 4 3/4” w x 7/8” deep

    As Professor of art in the Fine Arts 3D Department at Massachusetts College of Art and Design,he has been teaching jewelry, metalsmithing, digital techniques for object-makers (CAD) and other classes since 1985.

    He has taught summer workshops and has been part of several conference events at Haystack Mountain School of Crafts. He has also taught workshops at The Royal College of Art in London, Silpakorn University in Bangkok Thailand, and Penland School of Crafts.

    At MassArt, Wood organized five international symposia, organized and curated “In Situ”, an exhibition of contemporary metals artists at MassArt. Exhibitions of his work include one-person shows at Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge MA; group exhibitions include Schmuck 2001, Munich Germany; Signals: Late 20th Century American Jewelry, Cranbrook Museum of Art. Work is in the public collections of the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution, Racine Art Museum, Racine WI, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.

    Inquire

  • Unidentified_Brooch_Back.jpg
    Joe Wood
    Circum Brooch, 1990 (back)

    Inquire

  • Unidentified_Brooch_Detail.jpg
    Joe Wood
    Circum Brooch, 1990 (side)

    Inquire

  • Rossbach, Ed_Bark Structure_1993_11%22x6.75%22x8%22.jpg
    Ed Rossbach
    Bark Structure, 1983

    11”x 6.75”x 8"

    Inquire

  • Rossbach, Ed_Bark Structure_1993 2.jpg
    Ed Rossbach
    Bark Structure, 1983 (top)

    Inquire

  • Rossbach, Ed_Bark Structure_1993 3.jpg
    Ed Rossbach
    Bark Structure, 1983 (another angle)

    Inquire

  • Rossbach, Ed_Bark Structure_1993 title.jpg
    Ed Rossbach
    Bark Structure, 1983 (signature detail)

    Inquire


Joyce J. Scott
Landscapes, 1994

Neckpiece. Beaded glass beads.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Joyce J. Scott
Landscapes, 1994 (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Heather White
Protean Cameo #3, 1999

18K gold, coral, sterling silver


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Heather White
Protean Cameo #3, 1999 (from side)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Heather White
Protean Cameo #3, 1999 (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Tina Fungholder


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Tina Fungholder


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Tina Fungholder


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Tina Fungholder


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Brooch, 1990

Reversible brooch,glass, silver, 14k gold


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Brooch, 1990 (opposite side)

Reversible brooch,glass, silver, 14k gold


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches, 1993

Slumped glass, sterling silver, fine silver, gold


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches, 1993 (detail of removed brooches)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Julie Mihalisan
Necklace with Nine Removable Brooches (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Big Fella, 1989


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Big Fella, 1989 (other side)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Big Fella, 1989 (signature detail)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
Brooch #1445, Apex, 1989.

Copper,silver, polymer clay, paper, found objects. Signed and dated by artists.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
Brooch #1445, Apex, 1989. (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
Brooch # 1650, Untitled, 1994

Copper,silver, polymer clay, paper, found objects, leaf segment of a brass drawer pull,
Signed, dated, and numbered by artists.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Kim Overstreet and Robin Knantzky
Brooch # 1650, Untitled, 1994 (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Japanese Trick Box, pendant, 1994

Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail)

Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail back)

Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord. There is some wear to the leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Japanese Trick Box, pendant (detail clasp)

Ojimeand agate. Silver and brass frame. Leather cord. There is some wear to the leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Amulet

Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Amulet (back)

Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ramona Solberg
Pendant (clasp detail)

Bone, silver, bronze. Leather cord.


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Joe Wood
Circum Brooch, 1990

Oxidized silver,gold,stainless steel. hand fabricated pin back


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Joe Wood
Circum Brooch, 1990 (back)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Joe Wood
Circum Brooch, 1990 (side)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Bark Structure, 1983


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Bark Structure, 1983 (top)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Bark Structure, 1983 (another angle)


Artwork Inquire Form

×

Ed Rossbach
Bark Structure, 1983 (signature detail)


Artwork Inquire Form

×